HOME
SHOP
CONTACT
BLOG
SWANKYJEWELS
AMAZING BEADS BLOG
May 2017
Amazing Beads Customers
Customer Jewellery Makes
BEADING TIPS
Beading Tips
Display Tips
Jewellery Tips
BUSINESS TIPS
Branding Your Shop
Business Tips - General
Craft Shows
Jewellery Parties
Marketing
Pinterest
Promoting Your Business
GEMSTONE INDEX
Birthstones
Gemstone Charts
Pearls
GENERAL STUFF
General Info
Photos
JEWELLERY/ VINTAGE ACCESSORIES - HOW TO WEAR THEM
Bracelets
Brooches
Earrings
Necklaces
Runway Jewellery
Stacking
Sunglasses
Tassels
Tidbits
KILMEEDY LODGE ANIMAL SANCTUARY
Animals
General/Gardens
MONTHLY BLOG ARCHIVE
1. March 2017
2. January 2017
3. October 2016
4. September 2016
5.January 2016
6. April 2015
SUE - ABOUT
About
TESTIMONIALS
Testimonials
Pinterest For Your Brand

So you have set up your PInterest Business Account (it IS the business account you've set up isn't it, not a personal account ?). Now you need to set up some boards. You may find this easier to do as you notice things you want to pin, or you may have some already in mind.

* * * * *

Naming Your Boards

Some suggestions for you to start with, might be boards such as inspiration, favourite places, creative workplaces, colour, anything at all to do with your craft and your business, and perhaps some things that you just like. When you are thinking of naming your boards, try to make them stand out, but don't make them sound so quirky that no-one else can understand what they are going to find on them. (I know for a fact that there are a few of mine that I might need to change.)

Whatever you do, name your boards so that people can find them when they key in a search. 'My Products' just won't cut it. You have to be more specific. You can also pin on multiple boards to make sure that your items are found. So for example when I am pinning listings from my Etsy shop Swanky Jewels, which sells jewellery, I would add them to my boards, for Swanky Jewels, Jewelry, vintage jewelry, bracelets, vintage bracelets AND pearls.
(You will notice that I have used the US spelling on my boards. That's because many of the people who have Etsy shops, and also many of the people who use Pinterst, are in the US - but that's entirely up to you.

* * * **
Photography

When adding pins to you board you need to remember that Pinterest is super visual. The prettier and the more beautiful your images are, the more likely they will be repinned. Remember this too, when pinning other peoples pins or work to your board. If you like what's in the pin, but you don't like the actual photograph, then don't pin it to your boards. You want your boards to look fantastic to everyone that looks at them. You will be adding only your own best photographs to your boards, so why pin someone else's photograph that isn't that great, and ruin all your hard work?

While we're talking about other peoples people's pins and photo's, I would just add here that it is best for you to pin a good selection of your own pins, AND other peoples. Just your own pins would be boring to anyone else, as would just Etsy items etc. Get a good mix going.

* * * * *

Your business Pinterest account should be a set of boards, where people (potential customers?) can get a feel for you and your business.

This will include a little bit about you personally, as in your likes and dislikes, interests and so on, and a lot about your business, shop, items, standards, quality and so on. A little bit like your shops 'About' page.

If you want to add private stuff, trade secrets etc you can set up secret boards that only you can see. In these you can catalogue your ideas designs in progress and other stuff that you don't want people to see at the present time.

* * * * *
Of course you can edit and change your boards at any time, so the thing to do is just start.

7 September - How To Set Up and Use Pinterest for Your Business - Part Two - Boards

Boards

Boards are where you collect your Pins. You can add new boards from your profile or while you're Pinning, and you can always edit a board if you ever need to change its name or description.

You can add a new board from your profile

* Click your name at the top of Pinterest then click Your Profile & Pins.
* Click Create a Board.
* Choose a name and category for your board. You can also make the board secret or invite others to Pin to it.
* Click Save Changes when you're finished.

Or add one while you're Pinning

* Open the board picker
* Type a title for your new board in the Create New Board field
* Click Create

Edit a board to change its name or description
* Go to the board and click Edit
* Or, open up the board and click Edit Board
* Make any changes to the board info
* Click Save Changes

Use the Delete Board button if you want to permanently delete your board

When you delete a board, all the Pins on that board are deleted as well. You can't restore deleted Pins or boards, so be careful!

Board covers default to the first Pin on the board, or you can choose your own

* Hover over the board and click Change Cover
* Scroll through your Pins and pick your cover pin
* Click Save Changes when you're done

A good thing to do is to change your Board Covers once a week. It makes your boards more interesting for regular visitors, and highlights new items you may have added to your shop, and new pins you've added to boards.

You can organize your boards however you'd like
* Click your name at the top of Pinterest then click Your Profile & Pins
* Drag your boards to rearrange them—just drop a board where you want it to be and Pinterest will save it for you!

Sometimes if you rearrange boards all at once, they don't save. Try moving a few and then refreshing the page to make sure the new order sticks.
Having problems with your boards?

Arrangements aren't sticking: Make sure your browser is up to date, then clear your cache and cookies.

Can't rearrange Pins: For now, you can only rearrange boards, not Pins within a board.

* * * * *

Put Pinners first

Consider what Pinners really care about. Check out your web analytics to see what they like best, or talk to them directly. Tailor your Pins for them.


Show what inspires you

Instead of just showing off your products, show what inspires them. Create boards for the ideas, places, people and moods behind your brand.

Be authentic

Use your boards to show your values, personality and taste. It’s okay to get creative and be yourself. In fact, we recommend it!

* * * * *

8 September - Using Pinterest For Your Business - Part Three - Secret Boards

Secret boards

I mentioned Secret Boards yesterday. A secret board is only visible to you and people you invite to it. When you add a Pin to a secret board, it won’t show up anywhere else on Pinterest—not in the category sections, search results, your followers’ home feed, your own home feed or even the Pins section of your profile.

Your secret boards are at the bottom of your profile. Just scroll down to see them.

You can create a new secret board from the bottom of your profile

* Click your name at the top of Pinterest then click Your Profile & Pins
* Scroll to the bottom of your profile
* Click Create a Secret Board
* The secret setting will already be set to Yes—this means your board is secret
* Choose a name and category for your board and click Create Board

Any time you're adding a new board, you can switch the secret setting to from No to Yes to make it a secret board. But you can't make an existing public board secret.

If you don't invite anyone to your secret boards

* Only you can see your secret boards and Pins
* Only you can see comments you make on your secret Pins
* You won't see secret Pins on your home feed or in the Pins section of your profile—you have to go to your secret board to see its Pins
* Followers can't see your secret Pins in their feeds
* People can't see your secret boards on your profile page
* People can only see the number of public boards, Pins and likes on your profile page
* Secret boards and secret Pins won't appear in public areas of Pinterest, such as search results, category feeds, etc.

You can always make a secret board public (but you can't undo this!)
* Go to the board and click Edit
* Turn the secret setting from Yes to No
* Save Changes and confirm that you want to make the board public

When you make a secret board public

* People who follow all your boards will be added as followers to your newly visible board
* People can see all of the board's Pins and can Pin, like or comment on them
* Current Pins won't be added to the top of your followers' feeds, but any new Pins will
* Pins will show in search results, categories, etc.

When you make a secret group board public

* People can see all the group Pinners and their comments on the board
* People can see the board on all the group Pinners' profiles and follow it

You can't edit a public board to make it secret. You can only create new secret boards.

Similarly, you can't edit an existing Pin to move it to a secret board—since public boards or Pins may already have Pins or likes, you can't make them secret.

You can Pin from a public board to a secret one. This is like creating a secret copy instead of moving the original Pin.


If you and another Pinner are following each other, you can invite them to a group board
* Go to your secret board and click Edit
* Enter the person's first and last name (or email address) under Who can add Pins?
* Click their name once it comes up
* Repeat for any other people you'd like to add
* Click Save Changes


You can Pin things to and from secret boards or like secret Pins using the same Pin It and Like buttons.

* When you Pin or like from a secret board
* Secret Pins you like won't show on the Likes section of your profile—just go to the secret board to see what you've liked.
* If you Pin a secret Pin to another board, we won't show the board or person you Pinned it from.
* When you Pin to a secret board
The original Pin won't show a +1 on the Pin count

* * * * *


You can always make a secret board public (but you can't undo this!)

* Go to the board and click Edit
* Turn the secret setting from Yes to No
* Save Changes and confirm that you want to make the board public
* When you make a secret board public
* People who follow all your boards will be added as followers to your newly visible board
* People can see all of the board's Pins and can Pin, like or comment on them
* Current Pins won't be added to the top of your followers' feeds, but any new Pins will
Pins will show in search results, categories, etc.

When you make a secret group board public

* People can see all the group Pinners and their comments on the board
* People can see the board on all the group Pinners' profiles and follow it

* * * * *

You can't edit a public board to make it secret. You can only create new secret boards.

Similarly, you can't edit an existing Pin to move it to a secret board—since public boards or Pins may already have Pins or likes, you can't make them secret.

You can Pin from a public board to a secret one. This is like creating a secret copy instead of moving the original Pin.

* * * * *
You can Pin things to and from secret boards or like secret Pins using the same Pin It and Like buttons.

When you Pin or like from a secret board
* Secret Pins you like won't show on the Likes section of your profile—just go to the secret board to see what you've liked.
* If you Pin a secret Pin to another board, we won't show the board or person you Pinned it from.
* When you Pin to a secret board
* The original Pin won't show a +1 on the Pin count
* The original Pinner won't get a notification about the secret Pin, who added it or what board it was added to
* These are some general details about boards. I hope you find the helpful.

* * * * *

You can Pin things to and from secret boards or like secret Pins using the same Pin It and Like buttons.

* When you Pin or like from a secret board
* Secret Pins you like won't show on the Likes section of your profile—just go to the secret board to see what you've liked.
* If you Pin a secret Pin to another board, we won't show the board or person you Pinned it from.
* When you Pin to a secret board
* The original Pin won't show a +1 on the Pin count
* The original Pinner won't get a notification about the secret Pin, who added it or what board it was added to

* * * * *

11 September - Pinterest Part 3 - How to Promote Your Shop With Pinterest

Millions of people use Pinterest every day to explore their interests, find products to buy, and connect with people who share similar interests. Many pinners are already interested in the things you make and sell, so the more people pin, discover, and repin your products, the more likely new customers will be to discover your shop. Here’s a handful of straightforward tips to help you promote your Shop on Pinterest.

* * * * *

Make Your Boards as Cool as Your Shop

• Create a range of boards that showcase your shop’s personality and taste, and make sure each board has enough pins to make it feel substantial so pinners will feel like it’s worth following.
• Give your boards clear names so people can instantly understand what’s on them, but don’t be afraid to get creative — just keep names to 20 characters or less so they don’t get truncated. And don’t forget to categorize each board and include a description, which can inspire people to follow your boards and help you appear in searches.
• For each board, pick a compelling cover pin that quickly gives people a sense for that board — often the one with the most repins works well.

* * * * *

Try to pin at least once a day so your followers get fresh content in their home feeds. You might also want to pin throughout the day instead of all at once. And don’t feel like you need to just pin your own stuff. You can tell a much richer story about who you are, what your shop represents, and what inspires you by including pins from others.

You can even use pinning as a way of telling stories about your products. Pinning a handful of pins at once that together tell a fuller story can capture the imagination and help you make a deeper connection with pinners. For example, a shop that sells women’s coats might pin a product photo alongside some pins of beautiful winter scenery to help inspire pinners about the magic they can experience outside in wintertime. Just remember that most people are probably going to see the pins individually as pinners discover and repin the individual pins they like best.

Just like with boards, thoughtful descriptions will make your pins more inspiring and searchable. So take a moment to write descriptions for the stuff you pin — and don’t forget that your product listings have descriptions, too, which are automatically included when people pin your stuff through the Pin It button.

For their “All Things Cozy” board, Anthropologie pins their own items as well as things that inspire them. Creating boards for the ideas, places, people, and moods behind your brand is a good way to tell a more vibrant and well-rounded story.

* * * * *

Don’t Be Shy

A great way to get people pinning your stuff is to be an active pinner yourself. Follow other people’s boards and then repin, like, and comment on pins that inspire and relate to your shop. This will help people get a sense for what makes your shop special.

What kinds of things should you repin and like? What should you say in comments? This is where mum’s advice kicks in: Just be yourself! It’s also a good idea to let your customers know you’re on Pinterest. When you exchange messages with them, for example, include a link to your Pinterest profile so they can follow you and repin your pins.

* * * * *

Learn From Pinners

Keeping an eye on what kinds of things people are pinning and repinning can help you stay on top of trends. You can also search for your products (and similar products) on Pinterest to see what boards the pins appear on, how they’re described, and what people pin along with your stuff. All of these insights will help you make smarter choices about the products you make and sell and will help you evolve your pinning strategy.
you make and sell and will help you evolve your pinning strategy.

Every pinner is unique, and everyone has personal interests and tastes. So no matter what you sell in your shop, there are pinners who would love to see what you have to offer. And since pinning their favorites means sharing with their followers, anytime someone pins your stuff, it helps other people discover your shop.

If you’d like to learn more, check out business.pinterest.com, where you can find success stories, more tips, and a blog to help you stay up to speed on all things Pinterest.

* * * * *

You can get lots of ideas for pins and how other people use Pinterest here:

http://business.pinterest.com/en/blog/feed -just-shopping

Happy Pinning

WEEK 3: PINNERS INTEREST AND BEHAVIORS


Overview of the week

During this week, we will focus on the type of pins that can engage more your audience with your content and your brand.

Your To Do List for this week includes the following:

TO-DO LIST

- Read Pinterest’s study about Pinners interest and behaviours

- Define your audience interest

- Organize your board around your audience interest, your brand value and your personal taste.

- Create new boards and add Pins

- Think also about what content your business already has that you could add to those boards

- Create a local board and Pin your favourite teammates’ items.

* * * * * *

A lot of time this week will be spent on working on your brand. So lets start...


Just What Is a Brand?
It’s more than just a tagline, a logo — or in Mr. Clean’s case, a big bald man with an earring. A brand is an expectation, a perception, and branding is about crafting and communicating that perception. The trappings that help shape a brand’s image — jingles, mascots, vaguely homoerotic spokesmen — exist as a shorthand to bring that perception to mind.

If we ask 100 people to describe Kim Kardashian, they’ll give us fairly consistent adjectives (and mention a certain body part, I’m guessing). The same would happen if we asked folks about Apple, Fox News, or Martha Stewart.

These companies, products, and celebrities are all strong brands. Take Fox News; some love it, some… not so much, but everyone knows nothing too terribly Kumbaya is ever going to come out of anyone’s mouth on Fox News, which is thrilling or disturbing, depending on your politics. But everyone knows what to expect from them.

Your shop should have a brand, too, to let people know who you are, what you care about, why they should care about your product — what they can expect. A strong brand can attract new customers and keep existing ones loyal.

But first, you have to know what it is.

Defining Your Brand
It’s tempting to just focus on choosing a name for your shop, picking colors and fonts, and stressing over your avatar and photos on your About page. But these things should be outgrowths of the essence of your brand. Just what is your brand’s essence, you ask? First, answer these four questions:



1. WHY do you make (or sell) your items?

Think about how your story fits into your brand. In an environment like Etsy, a big part of the appeal is the authenticity and personal aspect of what you do. The story behind your products can attract customers because it makes what they’re buying special — and by extension, it makes them feel special. Read tips for telling your story in How to Make Your Items Gift-Worthy.

2. WHAT is important and consistent about your product? HOW is your product different?

What is your Unique Selling Proposition? What does your product reliably and uniquely bring to the table? Your “USP” is a way of expressing what you offer, what you value, and what people can expect. Think about what you sell: What makes your dog sweaters different from other dog sweaters; why is your hand-dyed yarn special; how do the vintage aprons you sell kick others’ vintage aprons’ asses? Think about what you offer from your customers’ perspective: What is unique about you that can serve their needs?


via BobbieGlue, WanderingWool, OliveVintage

3. WHICH words would you use (and want other people to use) to describe your items?

Say you’re a dog photographer. You take pictures of pet owners’ dogs — and so do lots of other people. What adjectives can you use to differentiate and position yourself from your competition? Try the 20/10/4 exercise: Choose 20 words to describe your brand, then whittle them down to 10, then 4. The pet portraitist whose four words are “soulful, spiritual, accessible, and playful” appeals in a different way than one whose are “sophisticated, experienced, elegant, and chic.”

4. WHO are your customers? (And, no, “everybody” is not an acceptable answer.)

Don’t fall into the trap of trying to be everything to everybody. Think about who your likely customers might be and build a brand to appeal to them. How old are they, what kinds of TV shows do they like, how much money do they make, where do they live — anything that might help you zero in on prospective buyers’ mindsets. Do you make jewelry with skull and vampire motifs? Maybe preppy colors and peppy taglines aren’t the way to go.

Building Your Brand
You’ve defined your brand’s essence — its values, attributes, its story. Now that you know what perception you want customers to have, it’s time to craft a brand message by sailing the seven Cs:

• Be CLEAR. The simpler and clearer the message, the better chance you have of standing out and being remembered. Again, don’t try to be a lot of things to a lot of people. Stand for one thing in a big way.

• Be COHESIVE and CONSISTENT. Make sure your brand messaging makes sense across platforms. If your Etsy store conveys glamorous and gutsy, your emails, social media marketing, flyers, and business cards should as well. COMMUNICATE your brand in all your packaging: Your shop’s name, logo, fonts and colors should all align with your brand’s core attributes.

• Be COHESIVE and CONSISTENT. Make sure your brand messaging makes sense across platforms. If your Etsy store conveys glamorous and gutsy, your emails, social media marketing, flyers, and business cards should as well. COMMUNICATE your brand in all your packaging: Your shop’s name, logo, fonts and colors should all align with your brand’s core attributes.

• Know your COMPETITION. To position your brand within a competitive landscape, you have to know who else is out there. Positioning is not something you do to your product — it’s something you do to customers’ minds (and, hopefully, their hearts and pocketbooks). Positioning is about shaping your potential buyers’ perception. First, ask yourself what people already think about the category of product you sell. What do they already own? What new problems can you solve? What new ways can you make their lives better? How can you fill a hole by meeting needs other sellers aren’t meeting and addressing issues other sellers aren’t addressing? (For example, if you want to sell soda when Coca-Cola dominates the market, be the un-cola.)

• Know your CUSTOMERS. Business, like life, comes down to relationships. Build relationships and you’ll build your brand and your business. Know your customers — what they like, what they want, what they need — and how you can deliver all three.

Encourage feedback in your About page and social media channels. I always say, the best marketing is the kind other people do for you.

• CAPTURE attention. Be direct, be authentic, be helpful, be funny, be bold, or be surprising. Be memorable.

Have you got your branding right? You need to, to get interest on Pinterest (hah! that rhymes!)

WEEK 3: PINNERS INTEREST AND BEHAVIORS



Today we are continuing with building your brand so that Pinterest users know who they are engaging with,

Creating a Brand Identity for Your Shop

For most people, the term “brand identity” conjures images of multi-national companies and shiny corporate logos. But branding isn’t a marketing strategy that only the big boys should use. Even the smallest of businesses can benefit from a strong brand image.

But what is a brand? It’s the promise that a shop makes to its customers. Your brand tells your customers what they can expect from your products and what differentiates your products from your competitors’. Simply put, your brand is a combination of the image you are trying to project for your business, plus the associations and memories that your customers bring to the table when they encounter that image.

What does your brand promise? What expectations does your customer have for your shop? Are you the innovator, offering cutting edge products? Are you the eco-friendly business that promises a commitment to renewable materials? Do you promise low-cost, high-value items, an intriguing story, or the friendliest customer service? Consistency is key. When you meet your customer’s expectations, you are keeping your brand’s promise. If your customers’ expectations aren’t met, they won’t make repeat purchases or recommend your products to their friends.



Circa Ceramics is an excellent example of branding in action. This shop’s logo, font, and tone of voice support their brand image: functionality, color, and fun.

Our job, as business owners, is to capture what is special about our products and communicate that unique selling position to our target audience with uncompromising consistency.

Defining Your Brand

Discovering your brand identity is a process of business-minded self-discovery.

Try asking yourself these questions:
1. What are your shop’s values?
2. What are the unique features and benefits of your products? Why should a customer choose you over another company?
3. Who is your target market? And what do your existing customers already think of your shop?
4. What do you want your customers to associate with your shop? What are the emotional, somewhat intangible attributes that your customers can experience and identify with?



Little Sapling Toys: This shop’s visual aesthetic and written communication (especially their awesome profile) support their brand’s image: modern, natural, organic, and sustainable. Their brand values are showcased in recycled packaging and participation in their local green power program.

Get the Word Out: Consistent Brand Communication

Once you’ve defined your brand, try these simple tips to communicate your brand to your customers during each part of a sale.

Before the Sale

Get a great logo. Visual design is an important part of brand identity. Choose fonts and colors that evoke your brand.
Design marketing materials with your brand in mind. Your business cards, banner ads and promotional postcards should have a visual aesthetic that supports the image you hope to achieve for your brand. Use the same color scheme, logo placement and fonts. Your designs don’t need to be fancy, just consistent.
Integrate your brand image across your social media profiles. For example, match your Twitter background and Facebook fan page to your shop’s banner.
During the Sale

Write item descriptions with a tone of voice that reflects your brand’s personality.
Tell the story behind your product and how it relates to your brand values.
Use your photo background and props to help convey your shop’s identity to your target customers.
After the Sale



Design your packaging to be consistent with your brand’s personality. A well-packaged item will impress your buyers, turning fans into loyal, repeat customers. And don’t forget that your stamp, sticker, or label is an opportunity to remind your customers of your brand name and shop URL.
Branding extends to every aspect of your business, especially customer service activities like answering follow-up emails, shipping, and issuing refunds. As a business owner, you have a great opportunity to build your brand during customer service activities where you have the (rare) full attention of your customer.




Allen Company Inc: This shop’s pristine photography, focused product line, and artfully-displayed items support a strong visual brand image.

A strong brand can be a company’s most valued asset. Brands are based on a promise and built through consistent customer experience. Each customer interaction is an opportunity that can make or break the customer’s relationship with the brand.

When you develop a consistent brand image, your target customers will invest emotionally in your business, become loyal to it, and be your biggest advocates.






WEEK 3: PINNERS INTEREST AND BEHAVIORS

Today we are going to talk about 5 branding opportunities to boost your shop sales...

5 Branding Opportunities to Boost Your Sales

When marketing experts talk about branding, they often mention touchpoint opportunities — the moments in which customers and the outside world interact directly with any element of your business. These moments can occur before, during and after a sale, and take a variety of forms. Each interaction is invaluable for building loyalty and generating word of mouth traffic (and sales) for your shop. Branding can often feel like an abstract idea, but by homing in on your most influential touchpoints, you’ll be able to deliver on your brand promise from start to finish.

“Humans tend to personify things,” explains Tiffany Ard, self-proclaimed nerd and full-time mom behind Etsy shop Nerdy Baby. “Branding is all about taking control of that perception, and actively trying to shape what people view as your business’s personality.” Specializing in cleverly designed educational graphics, Tiffany’s Atlanta-based business took root in 2009, when she left her marketing day job and transitioned to freelancing as a graphic designer. Thanks to strong products and a clever marketing strategy, Tiffany soon landed a number of wholesale accounts with her designs, including big-name buyers Uncommon Goods and Think Geek. Throughout her entrepreneurial endeavors, thoughtful branding has remained a top priority.

As you set out to define your brand promise and the impact of your various touchpoints, ask yourself: What value am I providing to my audience through my product? What unique attributes (service, quality, experience, etc.) set my brand apart from the competition? How do I want customers to feel after interacting with my business? The culmination of your responses to these questions constitutes your brand promise, and should set expectations for you and your customers about your relationship.

Once you know what you’re promising to deliver, you can implement concrete strategies at each of your touchpoint opportunities, and measure their impact over time. Below are five universal touchpoints to help you get started.

Touchpoint One: Communication
What voice and tone do you use when communicating your brand?

Choices about voice and tone should apply to all of the copy related to your shop, including your About page, item descriptions and correspondence with sellers. There’s no right or wrong approach to take, but make sure how and what you’re communicating leaves an impression consistent with your brand promise. “It’s not a matter of being something you aren’t,” says Tiffany of Nerdy Baby. “It’s about emphasizing different parts of yourself to match the personality of your brand.” She describes her shop’s tone as “very conversational, full of little jokes at my own expense, but always clear and direct.” For instance, listings often include whimsical backstories about her illustrations, along with straightforward information about dimensions and other product details.

Learn more: Spend some time thinking about about strategies for maintaining accessibility, conveying care and expressing value with your language choices. Hone your tone further by exploring How to Be Your Own Best Marketing Tool.

Touchpoint Two: Customer Service
How can you go above and beyond in your direct interactions with customers?

Customer service is one of the most immediate and personal touchpoints of your brand, and should be handled as such. Fast response times, regular status updates and a generous helping of patience can leave a lasting impression that directly translates to repeat sales. “If something goes wrong during a sale, I go over the top to fix it,” says Tiffany. She makes it a priority to ensure they’ll evoke positive feelings from buyers every time they interact with her product — even if that means replacing something that arrived damaged in the mail.

Learn more: Don’t lose out on a chance to connect with motivated consumers because of a miscommunication; check out Your Customer Service Guide for best practices from Etsy sellers.

Touchpoint Three: Graphics and Visuals
Can customers clearly and consistently understand your brand and values through your visual assets?

Graphics can make or break how your business is perceived, either legitimizing your brand’s innate value or leaving potential customers confused and disinterested. Your visual messaging should be clear and cohesive, including all photography, logos and branded materials you share publicly. This consistency can be as simple as implementing a well-chosen font, suggests Tiffany: “I’m always on the hunt for fonts that are cute, but not too cute; clear and easy to read; unusual without trying too hard to get attention.”

Learn more: Start putting the pieces together with The Ultimate Guide to Telling Your Shop’s Visual Story and How to Make Your Photos Publicity-Ready.

Touchpoint Four: Packaging
What tangible message does your packaging present to customers?

Your packaging doesn’t have to be fancy or over-the-top, but it should reflect your brand’s priorities. For instance, eco-friendly and upcycled materials might reflect your shop’s environmental values, and a stamp that includes your contact information might bring additional continuity to a buyer’s experience. Since Nerdy Baby does not have a big budget for packaging, Tiffany reflects her brand using simple materials, including a cloth bag for storing her shop’s flash cards for future storage. She also designed a cut-out math mobile that’s printed on the inside of recycled packaging paper.

Learn more: Knowing your brand and what you’re hoping to convey to customers upon reception is all you need to get started. Read Branded Packaging Basics for more tips.

Touchpoint Five: Social Media and External Marketing
Does your brand remain consistent and engaging in the social sphere?

The principle of sharing is caring doesn’t just apply to elementary school antics. The types and quality of shop content you share on your social media channels can have a big effect on how potential shoppers perceive your business. “Social media is currently my biggest challenge,” Tiffany confides. “I’m trying to find a solid balance between grabbing the Internet’s attention, but not feeling like an annoying self promoter.” By reflecting back on her brand promise often, she’s developed a unique social media persona that echoes the tone of her shop. On Nerdy Baby’s Facebook page, for example, she divides her posts between shop announcements, product research posts and engaging social content that fits her brand’s off-beat side, including stories about trips to nearby museums and hilarious dialogues with her husband, Kevin.

Learn more: Strategy and consistency are key when it comes to promoting your business across external networks. Get started by learning How to Create a Facebook Campaign for Your Shop.

Bonus (Touch)Point: Customer Flow
Looking to go above and beyond by creating a curated brand experience? Think about the path a buyer might take when traveling through your shop, as they move through each of the touchpoints listed above. The goal with customer flow is to make the navigation experience between touchpoints as seamless as possible, with your brand acting as the glue holding each element together.

Touchpoints_Worksheet_Button
You can do this by adding links to related products or categories within your item listings, updating your policies based on frequently asked customer questions and even including a photo of your packaging within your photo gallery so customers know what to expect.






SEASONAL PINTEREST BOARDS

Think about setting up seasonal boards. For instance, now is a great time to set up a Halloween board if you are into that sort of thing. Lots of people on Etsy are looking to buy items for Halloween, so why not set up a board with anything you have for this time of the year, anything you like, other team members Halloween items etc etc.

Then of course there's Christmas. There are lots of Christmas boards you could set up to invite interest if you wish to do so. Trerss, decorations, food, gifts (including your own items etc etc.

This is a brilliant time to set up these two boards in particular. Don't forget to take them down after the event though, so that your Pinterest page doesn't look outdated.

* * * * *

TRENDS

Watch trends on Pinterest by looking at the “Popular” link on your Pinterest home pag: http://www.pinterest.com/all/popular/

• at your own pins to know what people are more interested about. You can see the number of likes and repins under each post. Do this regularly.


• Pin trends of the week: http://blog.pinterest.com/post/858247613 94/pin-trends-of-the-week

• Explore specialized interests listed by Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/explore/